List by family

 


Family

Plant Group

Genera

Species

Callithamniaceae

Algae

Campanulaceae

Annual or perennial tufted herbs with blue bell-shaped flowers at the ends of long slender erect stalks. The flower is a 5-lobed tube that is sometimes deeply split.

Dicotyledon

Caprifoliaceae

Perennials and shrubs with opposite, broad, pinnate leaves of broad spreading toothed leaflets. Clusters of small white flowers with petals joined in a tube, stamens inserted on the corolla tube, equal in number and alternate with the petal lobes, inferior ovaries. Fruit globular and berry-like. All plants are deciduous.

Image of Sambucus gaudichaudiana Image: David Meagher

Dicotyledon

Caryophyllaceae

Annual or perennial herbs. Simple leaves in opposite pairs with successive pairs oriented at right angles to each other. Flowers white or pink, with four or five sepals and petals and eight or ten stamens. Ovaries are superior and fruits are capsules.

Image of Stellaria pungens Image: Alison Kellow

Dicotyledon

Spergularia

Soft plants with many slender prostrate stems, leaves like thick threads in pairs encircling the stem above conspicuous stipules. Pink, cupped flowers in somewhat curved sprays. Fruit a globular capsule.

Stellaria

Five radiating white petals are cleft to the base, flowers appear to have ten narrow petals. Sepals usually three-nerved.

Casuarinaceae

Trees and shrubs with branchlets encircled at intervals by rings of minute scale-like leaf-teeth. The number in each ring varies with the species. Male and female flowers are often on separate trees. Male flowers are rings of brown or yellow stamens, female flowers little brown or red tufts of pistils. The fruit is a woody cone.

Image of Allocasuarina verticillata Image: David Meagher

Dicotyledon

Celastraceae

Trees, shrubs or climbers that are sometimes deciduous. Leaves are simple or absent. There are 3-5 petals and sepals and 2-5 stamens which are inserted on or beneath a conspicuous disc.

Image of Stackhousia viminea Image: Lorraine Norden

Dicotyledon

Centrolepidaceae

Cushions of threadlike leaves, with thin erect stems bearing tiny terminal clusters of flowers enclosed in stiff bracts.

Monocotyledon

Ceramiaceae

Algae

Characeae

Algae

Codiaceae

Algae

Colchicaceae

Petals and sepals look similar (=tepals) and are in one whorl. Tepals are convolute around adjacent stamens in the bud. This family continues to be under taxonomic review.

Image of Burchardia umbellata Image: David Meagher

Monocotyledon

Convolvulaceae

Twining, prostrate plants, with leaves spirally arranged. Flowers actinomorphic, sepals 5, corolla usually funnel-shaped and shallowly 5-lobed, stamens 5 inserted towards the base of the corolla alternating with lobes. Ovary superior, fruit a capsule.

Image of Dichondra repens Image: Gill Brown

Dicotyledon

Crassulaceae

Small succulent herbs with thick, reddish leaves and minute pink or white 4-petalled flowers. Leaves stalkless, flowers regular, petals pointed.

Dicotyledon

Cunoniaceae

Shrubs with tangled wiry stems encircled at intervals by rings of six apparent leaves, each ring really a pair of opposite leaves cut to the base into three leaflets. Cupped flowers of five or more petals.

Image of Bauera rubioides Image: Alison Kellow

Dicotyledon

Cyatheaceae

Tree-ferns. Sori are borne between the margin and the midvein.

Fern or fern-ally

Cymodoceaceae

Marine, perennial, submerged herbs. Leaves have sheathing bases with auricles. Scales are present in each leaf axil. Flowers are small and unisexual with no perianth present. Male flowers have 2 united stamens, female flowers are surrounded by 1-few bracts.

Monocotyledon

Cyperaceae

Perennial herbs growing in damp places; stems usually solid; leaves long and narrow often reduced to sheaths; flowers arising in axil of glume arranged in spikelets.

Image of Ficinia nodosa Image: David Meagher

Monocotyledon

Baumea

Twig-rushes are slender, rush-like, rhizomatous perennial sedges. Leaves and flowering stems are similar in shape and size. The flowerhead is a terminal panicle.

Carex

Perennial, grass-like sedges forming tufts to 1m, often with rhizomes. Flowers are unisexual in plume-like terminal spikes.

Cyperus

Sedges with creeping rhizomes. Leaves long and grass-like at the base of triangular flowering stems. Flowers are terminal umbels.

Gahnia

Saw-sedges have strap-shaped leaves sheathing round the stem and spirally arranged, tapering to a fine point. Leaf margins have very sharp bristles, the edges are like a saw. Flowers are cream in dark brown to black panicles. Fruit are hard nuts.

Isolepis

Club-rushes are rhizomatous, tufted, single-stemmed sedges, usually found in damp swampy ground. Leaves are basal and small or reduced to sheaths on the nodeless stem. The brownish-yellow flowers are borne in a dense terminal head of 1 to many spikelets, a stiff erect terminal bract continuing the stem. Fruit are nuts.

Lepidosperma

Sword-sedges are perennial sedges occurring in heaths and moist sites. Plants are tufted, spreading by creeping rhizomes. The erect stems and leaves are very similar in appearance and length, with all leaves basal and sometimes flatter than stems. Flowers are terminal panicles with the lowest bract sheathing the base of the panicle. The fruit is a nut, surrounded by 6 thickened whitish scales. The sword or rapier-shape of the leaves is the distinguishing characteristic.

Schoenus

Bog-rushes are tufted annual or perennial plants with short creeping rhizomes. Stems longitudinally grooved. Leaves usually basal, sometimes reduced to a sheath. Flowers in a cluster of spikelets, the rachillas strongly zigzagged.