List by family

 


Family

Plant Group

Genera

Species

Malvaceae

Plants usually have stellate (star-shaped) hairs on vegetative parts. Leaves are alternate, simple, are palmately veined and stipules are normally present. Flowers have 5 petals, 5 sepals and numerous stamens. The filaments of the stamens are usually united for most of their length to form a tube. Fruit is a capsule.

Dicotyledon

Menyanthaceae

Water loving herbs, erect or floating.

Dicotyledon

Mimosaceae

Wattles range in height from tall forest trees to prostrate shrubs, occurring in a wide range of habitats. The true leaves are finely divided and are most conspicuous when plants are seedlings. Some species retain these divided leaves while others form leaf-like structures called phyllodes. The yellow flowers are tightly clustered into globular flowerheads or cylindrically-shaped spikes. The pods contain hard seeds.

Image of Acacia myrtifolia Image: David Meagher

Dicotyledon

Monimiaceae

Found in mountain gullies in the Prom. Leaves are undivided and in pairs, flowers have a perianth of up to 10 segments, male and female flowers are separate.

Image of Hedycarya angustifolia Image: Alison Kellow

Dicotyledon

Montiaceae

Herbs with a thick taproot. Leaves sessile or shortly petiolate, simple and fleshy. Flowers in an inflorescence with 2 sepals and 5 petals. Fruit a capsule that dehisces longitudinally into 3 or 4 valves.

Dicotyledon

Myrtaceae

Trees and woody shrubs with simple leaves showing oil dots when held against the light, aromatic. Fruits are woody capsules opening by valves in the top. Petals inconspicuous, stamens long and conspicuous, forming balls, brushes or fluffy rings.

Image of Callistemon pallidus Image: David Meagher

Dicotyledon

Eucalyptus

The name derives from the Greek eu meaning 'well' and kalyptos meaning 'concealed' alluding to the cap which covers the stamens and falls away on flowering in all members of the genus. Identification of species depends on bark, leaves, buds and fruit.